Knitting chart

Knitting chart

modern seamless knits for the whole family

Knitting charts are presented in grid format, with each box or cell representing one stitch, each row representing a row or round knitting, and each column representing a column of stitches. The chart as a whole illustrates the right side (RS), or public facing side, of the work. Thus, the different types of stitches that can be in one cell are represented by symbols that mimic what those stitches look like from the RS of the fabric.

How to Read Knitting Charts #1: The Basics

How to Read Knitting Charts #1: The Basics

Working charts in circular knitting is somewhat different than working charts in flat knitting. Knowing how to read charts will help enhance your knitting by giving you the flexibility to add drama to your work.

How to Turn a Graphic into a Knitting Chart

How to Turn a Graphic into a Knitting Chart

For large lace projects like shawls, placing markers between repeats (this works for cables as well) will allow you to follow the chart for the number of stitches within each block between the markers. This also prevents you from losing your place.

Introduction: Making a Knitting Chart and Some Tips

Introduction: Making a Knitting Chart and Some Tips

I used the template I made for that: the cells have the exact proportions for a knitting chart. You can download it: it is grille.ots (grille, French for chart and ots means that it is a format of template spreadsheet, you can open it with Microsoft office Windows if you want, but the features are not exactly the same).

Helpful Tools For Keeping Your Place in Knitting Charts

Helpful Tools For Keeping Your Place in Knitting Charts

If you are working on two needles, using stocking stitch, and starting with right side facing, the first stitch to work is the bottom right hand corner. Right side (knit) rows are worked from right to left. Wrong side (purl) rows are worked from left to right.

How To Knit: Working from a knitting chart

How To Knit: Working from a knitting chart

Sometimes all the pieces of a garment would be shown on a chart like on picture sweaters, other times it could be just a motif or pattern repeat. Often the chart will be marked showing parts of the garment, edge stitches for each size and the pattern repeat. All charts will have a key to symbols used, explaining their meanings.

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By now this should not look too daunting. You have the row numbers, you know what comes after the centre stitch and this should knit up fine on first repeat, yes? But what if you have to work this chart 10 times? How would you feel about it then?

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With the wrong sides together, our fabrics are facing in opposite directions. The front fabric is facing us, and the back fabric is facing away from us. This means that the stitches on the front fabric are right side (RS) stitches, and the stitches on the back fabric are wrong side (WS) stitches.

How to follow a colourwork knitting chart

A knitting chart is a visual chart that maps the steps of your knitting pattern without using words. Learning how to read a knitting chart is a great skill to add to your toolkit as you move on to more challenging projects.